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dc.contributor.authorKratošová, Gabriela
dc.contributor.authorHolišová, Veronika
dc.contributor.authorKonvičková, Zuzana
dc.contributor.authorIngle, Avinash P.
dc.contributor.authorGaikwad, Swapnil
dc.contributor.authorŠkrlová, Kateřina
dc.contributor.authorProkop, Aleš
dc.contributor.authorRai, Mahendra
dc.contributor.authorPlachá, Daniela
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-21T09:59:58Z
dc.date.available2019-02-21T09:59:58Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationBiotechnology Advances. 2019, vol. 37, issue 1, p. 154-176.cs
dc.identifier.issn0734-9750
dc.identifier.issn1873-1899
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10084/134077
dc.description.abstractChemical, physical and mechanical methods of nanomaterial preparation are still regarded as mainstream methods, and the scientific community continues to search for new ways of nanomaterial preparation. The major objective of this review is to highlight the advantages of using green chemistry and bionanotechnology in the preparation of functional low-cost catalysts. Bionanotechnology employs biological principles and processes connected with bio-phase participation in both design and development of nano-structures and nano-materials, and the biosynthesis of metallic nanoparticles is becoming even more popular due to; (i) economic and ecologic effectiveness, (ii) simple one-step nanoparticle formation, stabilisation and biomass support and (iii) the possibility of bio-waste valorisation. Although it is quite difficult to determine the precise mechanisms in particular biosynthesis and research is performed with some risk in all trial and error experiments, there is also the incentive of understanding the exact mechanisms involved. This enables further optimisation of bionanoparticle preparation and increases their application potential. Moreover, it is very important in bionanotechnological procedures to ensure repeatability of the methods related to the recognised reaction mechanisms. This review, therefore, summarises the current state of nanoparticle biosynthesis. It then demonstrates the application of biosynthesised metallic nanoparticles in heterogeneous catalysis by identifying the many examples where bionanocatalysts have been successfully applied in model reactions. These describe the degradation of organic dyes, the reduction of aromatic nitro compounds, dehalogenation of chlorinated aromatic compounds, reduction of Cr(VI) and the synthesis of important commercial chemicals. To ensure sustainability, it is important to focus on nanomaterials that are capable of maintaining the important green chemistry principles directly from design inception to ultimate application.cs
dc.language.isoencs
dc.publisherElseviercs
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBiotechnology Advancescs
dc.relation.urihttp://doi.org/10.1016/j.biotechadv.2018.11.012cs
dc.rights© 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.cs
dc.subjectbiosynthesiscs
dc.subjectnanoparticlescs
dc.subjectbionanotechnologycs
dc.subjectgreen chemistrycs
dc.subjectcatalysiscs
dc.subjectpollutants degradationcs
dc.titleFrom biotechnology principles to functional and low-cost metallic bionanocatalystscs
dc.typearticlecs
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.biotechadv.2018.11.012
dc.type.statusPeer-reviewedcs
dc.description.sourceWeb of Sciencecs
dc.description.volume37cs
dc.description.issue1cs
dc.description.lastpage176cs
dc.description.firstpage154cs
dc.identifier.wos000456223900010


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